Merry%20headshot_edited.jpg
 

ABOUT ME

I am a Senior Research Audiologist in the Audibility, Perception, and Cognition laboratory (Director, Ryan McCreery, PhD) at Boys Town National Research Hospital.  I am passionate about translating evidence into clinical practice and advancing the field of research audiology. My current career goals are to improve community engagement 

within hearing research and to use effective science communication strategies to share study findings

with families, clinicians, and scientists. As part of that effort, I created this website to increase access to my published work and resources I have helped create. More resources on self-archiving and creating your own website can be found at www.csdisseminate.com.

I invite you to take a look at my publications, infographics, posters, and visual abstracts. Feel free to get in touch with me to say hi, for more information about my work, or if you have questions about what the research audiology life is all about.

 

RESEARCH PROJECTS

 

FINDING APPROPRIATE SOLUTIONS TO TREAT REDUCED AUDIBILITY IN KIDS (FASTRAK)

2020-2025

With the FASTRAK study, we aim to develop more accurate ways to test children’s hearing and develop clinical speech recognition tools that can help audiologists determine when children may benefit from being fit with amplification. These tools will be very useful for clinical audiologists who evaluate and treat children with mild hearing levels. We will be partnering with clinical sites at Boston Children’s Hospital, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, University of Iowa, and Washington University-St. Louis.

FASTRAK%20logo_edited.png

COMPLEX LISTENING SKILLS FOR SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN WHO ARE HARD OF HEARING

2013 - 2018; 2019 - 2024

In the Complex Listening studies, we are examining how auditory experience (hearing aid use and unaided/aided speech audibility) impact children's speech recognition outcomes.  We are interested in finding out how children's linguistic and cognitive skills impact their ability to listen and understand, as well.

Children coloring

OTICON EDUMIC

2019-2020

We are working with Oticon Pediatrics to evaluate children's speech recognition in noisy and reverberant environments when using the Oticon EduMic remote microphone. We simulated a classroom reverberation time (RT60) of 0.3s and completed an adaptive sentence recognition task in noise. We found that children who are hard of hearing could understand more in noisier environments when using the remote microphone--both with and without reverberation.

20190710_151336_edited.jpg

OUTCOMES OF SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN WHO ARE HARD OF HEARING

2013 - 2018

In the OSACHH study, we documented  children's academic, linguistic, and literacy outcomes in 2nd & 4th grade. We examined how children's outcomes were impacted by their early intervention and cumulative auditory experience.

OSACHH Logo.jpg

OUTCOMES OF CHILDREN WITH HEARING LOSS

2008 - 2013

The OCHL study was a multi-site, longitudinal project designed to study the developmental outcomes of children who are hard of hearing. We collaborated with the University of Iowa and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill to document linguistic, behavioral, cognitive, and hearing outcomes for children who are hard of hearing and children with typical hearing. One of our most important findings is that consistent use (>10 hrs/day) of well-fit hearing aids supports language development.

Color Transparent OCHL Logo.jpg
 

CONTACT ME

  • Twitter

Thanks for submitting!